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20130318
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99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
chronicles in his memoir, "valley boy: the education of tom perkins." it is a candid account of his life, his second marriage to romance novelist danielle steel, a manslaughter conviction in a boating accident in france, and the deals that made him so wealthy, starting with the first biotech company, genentech, here in san francisco. he and his partners launched genentech in 1976 with nothing more than a checkbook and an idea. >> the idea was to trick nature into letting us make something that didn't exist in nature -- in particular, human insulin. >> genentech's success led to new ways of treating everything from diabetes to dwarfism, and to getting rich. kleiner perkins' initial investment of $250,000 soared 800-fold to $200 million. >> that's what venture capitalists are created to do, and you can blame converting the orchards of silicon valley into parking lots partly on me and partly on genentech, because we proved that this kind of high-risk, high-tech venture capital could be an enormous home run, and everybody wanted to get in on it, including lots of entrepreneurs, and that's what go
like feeding programs in ethiopia and agriculture education in afghanistan. and he records it all through the lens of his own camera. >> you all of a sudden begin to kind of look around, and you notice there's a lot of people around that don't look too good. and, you know, they're hungry. and they don't have great living quarters. they may not have access to water. they don't have good sanitation. >> you were seeing farmers who couldn't feed themselves? >> oh, absolutely. i looked at that, and i thought, "you know, this is wrong. i understand agriculture. i should be able to do something about this." [ticking] >> coming up: the challenges of philanthropy. >> you know bill gates. have you said to him, "80% of what you're throwing down there in africa is not gonna work"? >> well, i've said it a little differently, i think, and that is that we need to quit thinking about trying to do it like we do it in america. >> the buffetts and bill gates when 60 minutes on cnbc returns. it's a new day. if your a man with low testosterone, you should know that axiron is here. the only underarm tr
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)